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What is Client/Server Networks?

What is Client/Server Networks?

Client/Server Networks One popular type of server-based network is the client/server network, where individual computers share the processing and storage workload with a central server.

This arrangement requires special software for the nodes and the server. It does not, however, require any specific type of network.
Server-based networks rely on special-purpose computers called servers that provide centralized repositories for network resources and incorporate centralized security and access controls.
In comparison, peer-to-peer networks have no centralized security or maintenance functions.
There are a number of reasons to implement a server-based network, including centralized control over network resources through the use of network security and control through the server’s configuration and setup.
From a hardware standpoint, server computers typically have faster CPUs, more memory, larger disk drives, and extra peripherals—such as tape drives in comparison with client machines.
Servers are also built to handle multiple requests for shared resources quickly and efficiently. Servers are usually dedicated to servicing network client requests.
In addition, physical security—access to the machine itself—is a key component of network security. Therefore, it’s important for servers to be located in special, controlled-access rooms that are separate from general access office areas.
Server-based networks also provide centralized verification of user accounts and passwords. Windows NT, for example, uses the domain model concept for management of users, groups, and machines, and for control of network resource access.
Before users can access network resources, they must provide their name and password to a domain controller, a server that checks account names and passwords against a database of such information.
The domain controller will only allow valid account and password combinations to access certain resources.
Also, only network administrators can modify the security information in the domain controller’s database.
This approach provides centralized security, and it permits you to manage resources with varying degrees of control, depending on their importance, sensitivity, or location. There are other negative aspects of server-based networks.
Centralization of resources and control does simplify access, control, and aggregation of resources, but it also introduces a single point of failure on networks.
If the server is not operational, a server-based network is not a network at all.
On networks with more than one server, loss of any single server means loss of all resources associated with that server.
Also, if the server that goes down is the only source of access control information for a certain set of users, those users can’t access the network, either.
Here are some benefits of server-based networks:
• They provide centralized user accounts, security, and access controls, which simplifies network administration.
• More powerful equipment means more efficient access to network resources as well.
• Users only have to remember a single password for network login, which allows them to access all resources that they have permission to access.